onceuponacook

….tales of taste and food wisdom, for modern times

Granny’s 72 Hour Beef and Lentil Broth March 27, 2012

Filed under: Recipes — Isabel @ 9:29 pm
Tags: , , , , ,

Our grannies really knew their stuff.…those bubbling stock pots were not for nothing!

Modern science has shown us what grandmother already knew.  As Sally Fallon (President of The Weston A Price Foundation) has explained:  Stock contains minerals in a form the body can absorb easily—calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, silicon, sulphur and trace minerals. It also contains the broken down material from cartilage and tendons– chondroitin sulphates and glucosamine,  sold as expensive supplements for arthritis and joint pain.

A good stock congeals as it cools, due the presence of gelatin. The therapeutic use of gelatin goes back to the ancient Chinese and research in France up to the 1950s showed that it was found to be useful in the treatment of a long list of diseases including: peptic ulcers, tuberculosis, diabetes, muscle diseases, infectious diseases, jaundice and cancer.  Babies had fewer digestive problems when gelatin was added to their milk.  Gelatin attracts and holds liquids, aiding digestion by attracting digestive juices to food in the gut.

Broth-based soup did more than please the taste buds:  “Stock is a healthy, light, nourishing food” said Brillant-Savarin, “good for all of humanity; it pleases the stomach, stimulates the appetite and prepares the digestion.”   And, Escoffier said:  “Indeed, stock is everything in cooking. Without it, nothing can be done.”

To read more about the fabulous nutritional value stocks and broths, I highly recommend:

http://www.westonaprice.org/food-features/broth-is-beautiful and http://www.westonaprice.org/beginner-videos/stocks-and-soups-video-by-sarah-pope

Well, here’s my warmly-spiced version of a traditional,  time-honoured soup that will  nourish, heal and make you smile:

WHAT YOU’LL NEED:

300g carrots

450g onions

Garlic: 3 cloves

Butter: 1 tablespoon

Beef dripping: 1 tablespoon (or another of butter)

Ground cumin: 2 heaped teaspoons

Ground coriander: 2 heaped teaspoons

Ground cloves: 1/4 teaspoon

Paprika: 1 heaped teaspoon

72 hour beef stock*: 2 litres

200g red lentils **

Tomato purée: 2 tablespoons

Parsley stalks: handful

Fish sauce (nam pla): 1 teaspoon

Ground black pepper: 1.5 teaspoons

Sea salt: 1.5 teaspoons

WHAT TO DO:

1.  Peel and very finely dice the carrots, onions and garlic, or blitz in a food processor for a few seconds until finely chopped.

2.  Melt the butter and beef dripping in a large saucepan and add the chopped veg. Season with 1 teaspoon salt and 1 of pepper,  cover with a cartouche (see Techniques: Sweating Vegetables) and sweat over a low heat for 10 mins  or so, until the veggies have softened.

3.  Stir in the cumin, coriander, cloves and paprika and continue to sweat for a further 5 mins, then add the beef stock, drained lentils, tomato purée,  parsley stalks and fish sauce.  Stir everything well and bring up to the boil.

5. Reduce the heat, cover and gently simmer the soup for 25 mins, or until the lentils are very soft. Check for seasoning, adding the remainder of the salt and pepper to taste. Let the soup sit until it has cooled down a little.

6. For a smoother soup, blitz with a hand blender, or in a food processor, until you get a good thick consistency with some texture.  If  you prefer a textured, take out about half the solids and blitz them until you have a smooth purée, then return them to the rest of the soup and stir well.

7.  To serve, re-heat the soup until piping hot and perhaps add a handful of home-made croutons (fried in a little beef dripping) and/or a swirl of thick, live home-made yoghurt (see post  coming soon: “Was Miss Muffet on a health kick?”).

Notes:

* Simmering the beef bones and vegetables for the full monty -72 hours – gives a tremendously rich, flavoursome broth (and will make the house smell delicious).  However, an 8 -12 hour stock will also be very tasty!

** Red lentils are very nutritious, but (in common with all legumes and beans) contain indigestible phytates and other anti-nutrients  They need to be rinsed well and soaked in water and two tablespoons of whey/cider vinegar/lemon juice for at least 8 hours (then rinsed again and drained) to neutralise these problematic substances and make the highly beneficial nutrients available.

Advertisements
 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s